How to Dispute Credit Report Errors Systematically

How to Dispute Credit Report Errors Systematically

Did you know that your credit report could have mistakes that even you’re not aware of? According to a Federal Trade Commission study, approximately 20% of the consumers studied had errors on the report from at least one of the major reporting agencies: TransUnion, Equifax and Experian. Could you be one of these consumers? Take advantage of the free credit report the federal government entitles you to each year and find out. Here is valuable information on what to look for and how to dispute credit report errors.

What Kind of Errors Should I Look For?

While some may have more importance than others, any inaccuracies can affect your credit numbers, which can play a role in determining your creditworthiness to lenders and creditors. According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the following areas are worth double checking.

• Identity – Verify your name, address, social security number and phone number. This area is where you may find indications of identity theft or incorrect information that belongs to another individual. Names may get mixed up if they’re similar or have Jr. or Sr. after them.
• Account Status – closed accounts still showing as open; reports erroneously listed as delinquent or late; debt listed more than once but with different names and incorrect dates on when the account was opened, or payment was made.
• Data Information –same account but listed multiple times under different creditors or a correction that was not actually entered.
• Balance – incorrect credit limit or current balance.

How to Dispute Credit Report Errors

Fixing errors on your credit report is the responsibility of the creditor who sent in the information and the credit reporting agency, but it must be reported by you. You must submit a report to both the agency and the creditor listing what you believe to be incorrect as well as copies of documentation proving the information. You must include your name, address and all pertinent information.

Send the information certified mail “return receipt requested” so you know they received the news. Agencies typically correct the mistake within 30 days unless they feel change is unnecessary. Once the change is made, they’ll send you a free copy of your report, which does not count as one of your annual free reports.

Get Your Free Copy to Dispute Credit Report Errors

Checking your credit report will not only help you find mistakes but can also make you aware of possible identity theft as early as possible. The sooner you’re aware of the problem, the quicker you can get it fixed. It’s effortless to get your free copy online. You also have the choice of which agency’s report you want to view. To dispute credit report errors you simply need to fill out a simple online form and specifying which statement you want.

Conclusion

An inaccurate credit report can affect you in many ways and cost you extra money. This can result in paying more in interest than they should or being overcharged on auto loans, credit cards, insurance premiums and various other financial obligations. The best way to know your information is correct is to get your free report. If there are mistakes, dispute credit report errors as soon as possible and verify that they get corrected.


How Many VA Loans Can You Have at One Time?

How Many VA Loans Can You Have at One Time?The Department of Veterans Affairs is a government agency that helps veterans and military personnel obtain financing to buy homes by offering the Veterans Affairs VA loans. Getting this loan offers many benefits to veterans and service people.

Some benefits include low or no down payment, less strict credit score requirements, fewer fees and more. Surprisingly enough, some veterans have more than one VA loans at a time. Read on if you want to learn more about how that works.

Is it Possible to Have More than One VA Loan?

It’s very possible to have more than one VA loan at a time. A second home can be bought by using what’s referred to as a Second-Tier Entitlement. The VA gives veterans a certain dollar amount known as an entitlement. So long as the maximum entitlement is not all used up, the individual can buy a second home with another VA loan.

The borrower will still have to qualify for the second loan with the lender. If the first mortgage was used for rental property, the borrower may need to show proof of rental income for the first property as well.

What Determines Loan Amount?

The loan amount for a VA loan is determined by the entitlement, which is $36,000. The original “old” maximum loan amount was typically $144,000. Four times the amount of the entitlement. This does not mean that $144,000 is the maximum amount a veteran could borrow.

The Veterans Affairs will guarantee 25% of the amount over $144,000. Because many areas are more expensive in which to live and buy homes, the maximum amounts are higher in those areas. For instance, in the DC Metro Area, the maximum loan limits are up to $768,750. This means the 25% guarantee entitlement would be $192,187.50. Again, having more than one VA loan is possible only if the veteran hasn’t used up his or her entire entitlement.

How Many VA Loans Can You Have at One Time?

If you were to ask a person who’s currently paying one mortgage off how they felt about getting another mortgage, they might say they’d run in the opposite direction. However, there are some circumstances where a homeowner is ready and willing to get a second loan or even a third loan. One situation is if the first or second mortgage is to be used as rental property. In this case, the mortgage payment is typically paid from the rental.


Another situation might be where the first mortgage is or will be paid off or the home is being sold. The veteran would be eligible for another VA loan because he or she is getting the entitlement back. Regarding having multiple VA loans at one time, the clearest answer is that it all depends on the amount of the entitlement and the maximum loan amount available.

It’s important to remember that while it may be Veterans Affairs that guarantees the loan, it’s still the lender that provides the financing, and a lender goes by the borrower’s finances. A lender is not going to be as concerned at the number of mortgages a borrower has as much as the borrower’s ability to repay them.

If you’re a veteran who’s ready to make a purchase or one who is interested in a second veteran’s loan, contact us and speak with one of our loan specialists. At First Choice Loan Services, Inc., we have a team of specialists ready to assist you in your loan process.


How to Buy an Expensive House with a VA Jumbo Loan

How to Buy an Expensive House with a VA Jumbo LoanWith the housing market picking up the past couple of years, more individuals and couples are attempting to purchase homes. Between the different loan types and programs now available, buying a home can be easier than one would ever imagine.

Veterans who want to buy more expensive homes have the option of getting a VA Jumbo loan. Veterans Affairs loans have always been a convenient option for military personnel. Here is some information on how that can be accomplished.

What are Jumbo Loans & How are They Different?

Jumbo loans are loans that are for an amount that is higher than the conventional loan amounts, which currently are at $453,100 in most of the U.S. and $636,150 in Alaska and Hawaii. Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae purchase loans from lenders and have set maximum amounts for a loan to be considered a conventional conforming loan. Loans higher than that amount are considered Jumbo loans.

Besides the loan amount being higher, there are other ways that Jumbo loans are different.

  • Higher interest rates
  • Require high credit scores
  • Higher income required
  • Employment history for a longer period is necessary
  • Require the borrower to have enough cash to make a few months of mortgage payments
  • Down payments are 10 percent to 15 percent higher than a conventional loan.

Jumbo Loans for Veterans

The good news for veterans is that Jumbo loans are not just for certain home buyers. Many were under the mistaken belief that because veteran loans offered special benefits they could not be offered as this type of loan. This is a misconception, because veterans can also get Jumbo loans if they meet the eligibility requirements.

Another piece of good news for veterans is that they have very competitive interest rates. Whereas regular loan rates are .25 percent and .5 percent higher than conventional loans, veteran’s Jumbo loans usually are not.

How to Buy an Expensive Home with a VA Jumbo Loan

Veterans can still buy an expensive home with a Jumbo loan. However, it will take a little calculation to get correct guarantee amounts and possible down payments. The Department of Veteran Affairs guarantees 25 percent of the $453,100, so if you purchased a home for $500,000, you would be required to have a down payment of 25 percent of the amount over $453,100, which would be $11,725 ($500,000 – $453,100 = $46,900 X .25 = $11,725).

While interest rates are usually not higher for veteran Jumbo loans, they could be higher. But the amount is still substantially lower than if you would have to put down a down payment on a conventional Jumbo loan. The Veteran Affairs program makes it very affordable for military personnel to purchase a high-end, expensive home.

The Department of Veteran Affairs provides veterans with an entitlement, which is a dollar they agree to pay back for the veteran towards the purchase of a home. The basic entitlement is $36,000, but it’s much higher when all is said and done. The only situation where a veteran would have to pay a higher down payment would be if they’ve already used up some of the entitlement on a previous mortgage.


Using a VA Loan for Multi-Unit Properties

VA Loan Multi-Unit PropertiesVA loans are mortgage loans used by veterans and their family members to purchase a home. The loans are backed by the Veterans of Foreign Affairs.

VA loans are typically used to purchase a residential home for an individual or family. However, there may be other situations when a buyer uses a VA loan, for example multi-unit properties.

Purchasing Multi-Unit Properties

While the buyer cannot use a VA loan to purchase investment property like a rental unit. The veteran may use it to buy properties.

According to VA regulations, investment property is property that the home buyer does not live in as a primary residence. Therefore, in order for a VA loan to be used to purchase multi-unit properties. The buyer must occupy one of the units even if the property isn’t bringing in any income.

In addition, the qualified buyer may not buy the property, live in it for a while, move out and then later use it as rental property. The requirement of living in the property is a legal binding contract between the buyer and the VA.

Are Income Qualifications Different for VA Loans for Multi-Unit Properties?

Buyers who purchase multi-unit properties often do so with the intent of renting them to generate income.

While it’s perfectly within their right to do this, as long as they continue to occupy one of the units, they shouldn’t do so with the intent of using future income to meet the income qualifications for the VA loan. This is not to say that the income can’t necessarily be used.

However, lenders are not going to just take the buyer’s word regarding income. If the buyer intends to use the income to help satisfy the income qualifications, he or she must provide the VA or lender with documentation of the buyer’s history as a landlord.

Because lenders may vary with their requirements, the buyer is advised to speak with the lender ahead of time to learn of any requirements the bank may have.

Additional Requirements Set by VA

Agreeing to live in one of the units is not the only requirement that must be met by the potential buyer (the veteran).

To prevent and help veterans and other buyers from buying properties that are not sanitary, sound or safe, the Department of Veterans Affairs has set Minimum Property Requirements (MPR) that the property must satisfy according to an independent VA appraiser.

These include the following.  

  • Residential property – Property must be used primarily for residential living.
  • Living space – The property must give the borrower and family members enough space to live, sleep and cook comfortably.
  • Water and sanitation – The property must show proof of a working water heater and sewage system as well as clean and safe drinking water.
  • Heating system – Heating system must produce heat in the interior reaching at least 50° Fahrenheit. If wood-burning furnaces or solar systems are used as heating sources, there must also be a backup heating source.
  • Mechanical infrastructure – The electricity, water, heating/cooling system, and other mechanical systems must in good working order and indicate they will be that way in the near future.
  • Architectural infrastructure – Roofing must be in good shape and indicate it will continue to be good for a designated number of years. Attics, crawl spaces and basements must not have water damage and must provide adequate ventilation. The foundation must be leak-free and sound.
  • Property Accessibility – Property must be street-accessible by a permanent easement or a year-round driveway.
  • Pest inspection – The home must pass a pest inspection. According to VA regulations, the fee for the pest inspection is not to be paid by the buyer.

If you are interested in purchasing a multi-unit property with your VA loan benefit, your best option is to contact a VA loan specialist, who can help you through all the red tape and help make your dream a reality.


4 Types of VA Loans

4 Types of VA LoansBuying a new home can be an exciting yet stressful experience, whether it’s your first home, second or even third. When you’re taking out a mortgage loan, it can be even more complicated. Luckily for veterans and military personnel, they have VA loan available to them.

Types of VA Loans

Whether you’re making your first home purchase or refinancing your current mortgage, it’s important that veterans know the types of VA mortgage available. Here are four types: 

  1. VA Purchase Loan

The VA purchase loan is probably the most common type of VA loans. This loan allows veterans who meet the eligibility requirements to purchase a home without having to worry about having a down payment.

About the only real requirements, other than being a veteran or spouse of a veteran, are that the borrower must meet the income and credit requirements and must also use the home as his or her primary residence.

  1. Streamlined VA Refinance

The streamlined VA refinance loan, also known as Interest Rate Reduction Refinance Loan, is a mortgage loan that allows the veteran to take advantage of lower interest rates.

VA loans are very advantageous to veterans because it not only offers lower interest rates but also allows the veteran to have lower monthly payments and possibly not have to pay closing costs.

The lender may offer to pay for the closing costs in exchange for slightly higher interest rates. The buyer may choose to take the lower interest rates and include the closing costs right into the loan.

  1. VA Cash-out Refinance

The VA cash-out refinance loan is a mortgage loan that allows veterans to take advantage of lower interest rates and get cash out of the equity of their home.

The home’s equity is how much the home is worth in terms of a home appraisal. For instance, if a veteran owes $80,000 on a home that’s worth $120,000, the veteran has $40,000 in equity. The $40,000 is the amount the borrower can take out in cash.

Some lenders won’t allow borrowers to take out more than 80 percent of the home’s equity while others may allow them to cash out 100 percent. Lenders may vary in their lending policies.

Veterans interested in a cash-out refinance will have to submit a Certificate of Eligibility to the lender.

  1. VA Rate-and-Term Refinance

The VA rate-and-term refinance is a mortgage loan that gets its name based on what it does. It allows the veteran to refinance a current mortgage to either change the interest rate or the term of the mortgage.

It differs from a cash-out refinance in that the borrower cannot take any cash out of the home’s equity. The loan balance basically stays the same.

If the veteran owes $100,000 on the loan, he or she will continue to owe this amount after the refinance. The only difference will be in the interest rate and the term of the VA loans.

Often, first-time borrowers take out mortgages with long terms, like 30 years, to have lower monthly payments. After paying on the loan for a few years, the individual may be in a better place financially and want to go with a shorter term.

However, the individual may choose to stay with the 30-year mortgage and take advantage of lower monthly payments resulting from the lower interest rates.

 


What Are the Seller Concessions?

What Are Seller Concessions When Buying a Home With a VA LoanBuying a home can be a complicated transaction. What initially appears as a simple transaction may get somewhat complicated when you factor in closing costs, loan fees, and whatnot. Suddenly it appears the asking price isn’t what you originally thought.

Seller concessions can be helpful in situations such as this. Learn how this can help you when buying a home with a VA loan.

What Are Seller Concessions?

These are contributions the seller agrees to make at the closing of a mortgage loan. Buyers often don’t realize how loan fees and closing costs can add up and change the amount of the loan.

In some situations, where the closing costs are high, a buyer may have to cancel the loan because of the final price being too high.

Seller concessions can help the home buyer go through with the loan because the seller is agreeing to pay many or all the additional fees. Depending on the type of loan, there may be a cap on the amount of concessions the seller can pay for the buyer.

What Type of Fees Are Included in Seller Concessions?

The types of fees that are included in seller concessions may also vary by the type of mortgage loan. Keep in mind that there are various types of mortgage loans, including VA, Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae, USDA, FHA and conventional mortgage loans.

Closing costs typically can include transfer fees, loan processing fees, title insurance costs, appraisal fees and transfer fees, among others.

When dealing with VA loans, the seller concessions may only go towards the following:

  •                Paying the buyer’s VA funding fee
  •                Prepayment of insurance or taxes on the home
  •                Paying extra points above two percent of the loan
  •                Providing escrow funds to give buyer a temporary interest rate buy down
  •                Paying off some of borrower’s bills or credit accounts
  •                Gifts from the buyer such as appliances

Generally speaking, seller concessions do not just include the typical closing costs but often go beyond that amount. While there may be a maximum percent s a buyer can ask the seller to pay, this does not include the loan-related closing costs. The concession is like an extra bonus.

VA Loan Seller Contribution Maximum

The amount that may be included in seller concessions also varies by loan type. Each loan type has their own maximum amount.

For instance, while USDA loans and FHA loans set their max at 6 percent, conventional loans can go anywhere from 2 percent to 9 percent. Some of it may also be dictated by individual state laws as well.

In the case of VA loans, seller concessions cannot be higher than 4 percent of the loan amount. If the loan amount is $150,000, it cannot be more than $$6,000.

Keep in mind, though, that while the seller may be limited to only paying $6,000 in concessions, the seller may also pay an additional amount towards customary loan costs. This total can add up to a lot and be a real savings to the buyer.

Here is an example of how this might work. Say the buyer’s closing costs for things like loan origination fee, title insurance and appraisal come to 2% of the purchase price. The buyer agrees to pay the VA funding fee, insurance, taxes and pay off some of the buyer’s old debts. This amount totals 3% of the sales price. Although the total paid by the seller equals 5%, it’s allowed because only 2% is actually going towards the closing costs.

 


2018 VA Loan Limits in Arizona

Big news for 2018 VA Loan Limits in Arizona. They have gone up, yet again! 2018 Arizona VA Loan Limits for Maricopa County have increased from $424,100 (2017) up to $453,100 with no money down. This mean Veterans and Active Duty Military can finance more with no additional money out of pocket. Our VA Home Loan Benefit is the only 100% financing with no money down and no private mortgage insurance home loan available on the marketplace. This increase makes the VA loan one of the most competitive loans available for Veterans today.

Did you know that the VA does not actually have a maximum VA Loan limit? They just have a maximum loan amount with no money down. The VA will allow us as Veterans to finance more than $453,100 by putting down 25% of the difference between the purchase price and the 2018 Arizona VA Loan Limits of $453,100. This is an incredible opportunity for Veterans seeking financing above the $453,100 threshold with no money down.

2018 VA Loan Limits do not just apply to purchasing a home. The good news is that if a Veteran would like to use the VA Loan for the purpose of a refinance, they too are eligible for the increased loan limits as well.


VA Loan Limits

VA Loan Limits with no money down vary from county-to-county across the nation. However, in most counties across the nation the max VA Loan Limit with zero down is $424,100.

There are many ins-and-outs of the VA Loan. After serving Veterans for many years one thing that I have learned is that the VA does not advertise the VA Loan program leaving us (the Veteran) to seek out the information regarding our loan that we have earned and deserved.

There are some circumstances where the VA allows Veterans to have higher VA Loan Limits. For example in some counties across the nation like Alameda-County California, the max VA Loan Limit is $636,150 with no money down. If you are up for a 5 hour drive south (okay maybe longer) down to San Diego the VA Loan Limit with no down payment is $612,950. So do you see how the max VA Loan Limits change dependent upon where you go?

Remember fellow Veterans that the VA does not lend the money, they just insure the loan. So just because the VA might say we eligible for that amount we still have to qualify from a monthly income, and credit perspective.

For more information about how VA Loans work and what current VA Loan Limits are in your county feel free to contact us today.

Semper Fi!

Jimmy V.

480-800-Vets (8387)


Bad Credit Rating – Can I Get A VA Loan?

Can I Get A VA Loan With a Bad Credit Rating?

Bad Credit Rating - Can I Get A VA Loan?While most VA home loan requirements are looser than those set by traditional banks, the VA still has some requirements when it comes to borrower credit score. If you would otherwise qualify for a VA mortgage, but have a bad credit rating, there are still ways to qualify for a loan that meets your budget and needs.

Buying a home is a very major personal and financial commitment. When buying a home, one of the biggest choices that you will have to make is picking a mortgage. For those that are members of the VA, or active military members, a great mortgage option would be to take out a VA home loan. VA home loans have a variety of approval criteria, which are generally not as tight as those set by most mortgage lenders.

Get a Co-Signer

One of the best ways to get a VA home loan if you have a bad credit rating is to get a co-signer to sign onto the mortgage. A co-signer is an individual that will take on the financial responsibility of the mortgage if you miss some payments.

Since there is another person that is taking on the financial requirements of the loan, the VA home loan lenders will be willing to take their financial situation into consideration. This will include reviewing the co-signers financial position and credit score.

Normally, it would be ideal if the co-signer were someone that will be living with you, such as a spouse or other family member.

More Money Down

One of the reasons why the VA takes credit score into consideration is because they often provide loans with as little as zero money down. While this is a great advantage for veterans that may not have a lot of cash saved, it does add risk to the lender and servicer.

If you have a bad credit rating and are not able to qualify for a traditional zero-down loan with the VA, a good option may be to put more money down instead. While it is not necessarily within their policy, if you are able to put down up to 20% of the purchase price, the lender may be willing to look past the poor credit score and approve you for the loan. However, you may still be charged a higher interest rate and fees.

Wait and Rebuild Credit

The last option that you may have for getting a VA home loan is to wait to buy the home and look for ways to rebuild your credit in the meantime. VA home lenders normally want their borrowers to have a credit score of 620.

If your credit score is in that range, it likely will not take too long to improve it to the 620 level. There are some easy and fast ways that you could improve your score, which would include paying down credit cards, opening a secured loan and show quality payment history for a few months, or have negative fraudulent information removed from your report. These tasks could lead to a quick improvement in your overall score.

Call Jimmy Vercellino – VA Loan Specialist

As an award-winning, nationwide loan originator specializing in VA loans, I can help you qualify even if you have a bad credit rating, or help you increase your credit score so you will qualify for a VA home loan. Contact me today!

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Buy Land with VA Loan?

Can I Use My VA Home Loan to Buy Land?

Using Your VA Loan to Buy Land and Build a HomeThe Department of Veterans Affairs allows borrowers to use a VA home loan to buy land and construct a new home on a piece of property as an alternative to buying a pre-built home.

There are restrictions placed on the way the funds can be allocated. VA loans must be used for eligible purchases, which allows the Veteran to “purchase or construct a residence, including a condominium or cooperative unit, to be owned and occupied by the veteran as a home.”

The loans can include the land where the home will be situated and may also be guaranteed for the construction of a residence on land the borrower already owns. It’s also possible to use the funds to refinance a purchase money mortgage or contract for the purchase of the land.

Restrictions

The VA home loan to buy land cannot be made under the VA program for unimproved land with a future intent to improve.

The loan also must be closed before construction can begin to allow the money to be allocated to pay for the land the home will reside on with the remainder placed into an escrow account.

This gives the bank the authority to distribute the funds and ensures that the builder can receive payment during construction.

This isn’t only applicable to those who want to buy land that is for sale. If you meet the requirements for a VA loan, land that you already have in your possession qualifies for funding under the program.

The simple answer to whether you can use a VA home loan to buy land is yes. It can’t be in a flood zone, in an airport noise zone, and must be away from high volt electric lines or unstable land conditions where landslides, sinkholes or earthquakes are common.

Finding the Right Lender

The primary problem you might find with using a VA loan for construction is locating a lender who will allow these types of loans for construction. There are no regulations in place that require lenders to finance construction loans.

You might have to try approaching a few different lenders before you’ll find one that is willing to work with you on the project.

In some cases, it is necessary for you to first get a conventional loan from a community lender or builder for the initial financing, and when construction is complete, refinance it under the terms found in the conventional VA loan.

The best way to ensure that you don’t waste your time applying for financing that isn’t relevant to your home-buying needs is to ask the lender questions right from the start.

If you don’t find what you’re looking for the first time, do research and locate a lender close by that will offer financing to put you in your dream home once and for all.

Better yet, call me – I can steer you through the process and help you find the right VA home loan at the best interest rate.